Naseeb loved music, cycling, reading, discussion, wildlife, ecology, socialising, and many other things.  He was studying Human Geography at Leeds Beckett University.  Naseeb had a beautiful mind, he was caring, thoughtful, was loved by many and gave love to many.

We his parents want this website to be a celebration of Naseeb’s great spirit and the many parts of his life that he and we all value, enjoyed and cherish.  Naseeb lived a vibrant and precious life which we will treasure forever.  He sadly took his own life on around 27th May 2016.  Naseeb’s passing away continues to be a devastating shock to us, to our family and to the many good friends both he and we have.

We began this website before Naseeb’s funeral and gradually more items have been added to create a memorial for Naseeb – there is a guide to the material you can view at http://www.naseebchuhan.wordpress.com/guide .  If you would like occasional news via email about remembrance activities or website updates please click the ‘EMAIL ME’ button.  For more frequent news, why not like our Facebook page?  (All links can be found on the side of this page if you are on a PC, or below if you are on mobile).

About Naseeb

From when he was a toddler, Naseeb gained a caring love for animals and wildlife.  For holidays we regularly used to camp in a tiny almost self-sufficient organic farm in Wales where he would milk the goats, feed the chickens, canoe around the lake and eagerly play with other children.  He became a member of World Wildlife Fund and has always loved watching David Attenborough programmes.  Naseeb enjoyed reading books from an early age and by his teens he would often read a few novels a week.  Naseeb was very sociable, he loved conversation and discussions around a wide range of narratives and issues.  He gained a reputation for being a strong and eloquent speaker.

Since nursery age, Naseeb loved all kinds of games and construction-based toys such as Lego which he creatively improvised.  He became a skilled chess player and gradually began to beat both his father and grandfather at the game.  Naseeb was really keen on playing squash from junior age through to mid-teens, playing in regional tournaments to a good standard.

He learnt guitar for some years, then switched to saxophone up to his mid-teens.  Music became a big part of his life and he would follow an increasingly wide range of artists and musical genres ranging from rock and hip hop to classical and jazz.  Naseeb would save up for tickets to see his favourite acts and travel with friends to music festivals including one in Croatia.

Naseeb also enjoyed films, theatre and dance performances.  At home he enjoyed helping out with cooking, baking and gardening.  Most recently he had gained an interest in cycling, and he had planned to do some touring with his father in the summer of 2016.

Naseeb was an intelligent, responsive and thoughtful young man.  At the end of junior school he gained entrance to Manchester Grammar School where his last form tutor described him as “a very capable student” and “a popular individual”.

From the age of 16 Naseeb regularly worked at Manchester United for four years, waiting on executive boxes.  During his gap year before studying in Leeds, Naseeb worked happily at the Z-arts Centre for 12 months.  There he widened his range of friends, gained skills and successfully met his work responsibilities to become “one of the most reliable people there”.

Naseeb maintained a rich interest in history and loved looking at the architecture of buildings whenever we went on travels.  He excelled on our holiday in Rome 2015, being a big admirer of Ancient Rome and becoming our highly informed tour guide.  Combined with his social and environmental conscience, he chose to study Human Geography at university.

He developed an enormous network of friends and was a popular young man, as seen by the sizeable crowd at his funeral.  The comments we have had from his friends all describe him as being a happy, lively, sociable, caring and thoughtful young man.  We are all shocked by Naseeb passing away at the tender age of 21 and at the end of his first year of university.

Naseeb was our only child and he was dearly loved.  Had Naseeb remained with us, we can only guess as to the direction he may have taken.  He had talked about going into teaching when he got older, yet he was also keenly interested in the environment.  Naseeb also had the aptitude, skill and acute memory to become a good barrister in the footsteps of his grandfather.  We are left bewildered and devastated.  We sincerely hope similar outcomes for other young people like Naseeb can be prevented and we encourage support for any such initiatives.

Advertisements